Premier Daniel Andrews has taken responsibility for his ‘captain’s call’ of 8pm until 5am curfews in Melbourne which he claims were designed to help Victoria Police enforce Stage Four lockdowns – even though cops didn’t ask for one.

Five million Melburnians are banned from leaving their homes each night between 8pm and 5am under some of the harshest coronavirus restrictions in the world.

The night curfew, which has now been in place for 57 days, will be eased to 9pm to 5am from 11.59pm on September 13.

Andrews admitted on Wednesday that he only introduced Melbourne’s overnight curfew to make it easier for police to enforce lockdown.

But in an extraordinary development, Victoria Police’s Chief Commissioner Shane Patton said he did not request a curfew and only found about the new law hours before the public was told. 

Andrews was also forced to backflip his previous claims he’d taken advice about the curfew from chief health officer professor Brett Sutton – after he revealed he didn’t recommend the curfew, either. 

Victoria Police boss says officers weren't consulted by the government over its decision to enforce a night curfew between the hours of 8pm-5am. Pictured are police patrolling the streets of Melbourne during stage four lockdown on Wednesday

 Victoria Police boss says officers weren’t consulted by the government over its decision to enforce a night curfew between the hours of 8pm-5am. Pictured are police patrolling the streets of Melbourne during stage four lockdown on Wednesday

When Chief Commissioner Patton was asked if police were consulted about the curfew by 3AW morning show host Neil Mitchell on Thursday morning, he replied: ‘No.’

‘At no stage?’ Mitchell quizzed further.

Again Comissioner Patton replied: ‘No.’

‘The reality is I was never consulted … our policy area was provided a copy of the proposed guidelines for our information a couple of hours before they were signed off.’

Commisioner Patton admitted the night curfew has been effective and made it easier for his officers to police the city.

‘We are able to enforce with the curfew and movement is very much restricted because of it … but we weren’t involved in discussions over it,’ he added.

He also admitted police found out about the curfew a few hours before being made public on August 2. 

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) has been forced to admit the night curfew was based on his advice

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews (pictured) has been forced to admit the night curfew was based on his advice

Mr Andrews was initially reluctant to identify himself as responsible for the curfew during his daily press conference on Wednesday.

‘I can’t pinpoint the individual and the day, I can’t give you a specific person,’ he told reporters.

‘If you want to go out and be unlawful now police have got the easiest set of arrangements they have ever had to catch you and fine you. That’s what a curfew delivers.’  

But after days of questioning, Mr Andrews finally admitted it was his decision to impose the curfew. 

‘These are decisions ultimately made by me, so the answer to the question (of why there is a curfew) is, I’ve made that decision. It’s a challenging one to make, but it’s effective.’

He reiterated his strong stance on night curfews on Thursday and vowed to remain accountable for his decision.

CSL chairman Brian McNamee has described the Premier's road map out of lockdown as a disaster and a 'map of misery'. Pictured are police patrolling Melbourne's Bourke Street Mall on Thursday, which remains under stage four lockdown until at least September 28

CSL chairman Brian McNamee has described the Premier’s road map out of lockdown as a disaster and a ‘map of misery’. Pictured are police patrolling Melbourne’s Bourke Street Mall on Thursday, which remains under stage four lockdown until at least September 28

‘As I said before, if people find fault with the rule, they can take it up with me,’ Premier Andrews told reporters on Thursday.

‘Decisions are made by groups of people. And I can’t necessarily pinpoint for you the exact individual and the exact moment that it was suggested that we put a curfew on. 

‘What I’m saying to you is, anyone who’s displeased with that or doesn’t think that’s a proportionate measure, well, that’s a decision that I’ve made.’

The premier insists the curfew has been effective and is working. 

‘There’s no denying – simply no denying – that those measures have made the job of police never easy, but it has made it clearer-cut, it has made it somewhat simpler, and driving down movement, just as a – there’s no denying less movement means less virus,’ Mr Andrews added.

‘That’s what all of these rules are about. And the curfew will come off when it is appropriate.’ 

A woman in a face mask crosses the road at Flinders Street Station in Melbourne on Tuesday

A woman in a face mask crosses the road at Flinders Street Station in Melbourne on Tuesday

He added the night curfew was about achieving health outcomes. 

‘It’s not a matter for Brett [Sutton], that’s not health advice, that’s about achieving a health outcome,’ the Premier said.

‘His advice is ‘do whatever you can to limit movement’. Police then say ‘we need rules we can enforce’. These are decisions ultimately made by me.’

‘It just makes the job of police much, much easier.’ 

Under some of the toughest coronavirus restrictions in the world, five million Melbourne residents are not allowed out of their homes between 8pm and 5am. Pictured: Police patrol Elizabeth Street on Sunday

Under some of the toughest coronavirus restrictions in the world, five million Melbourne residents are not allowed out of their homes between 8pm and 5am. Pictured: Police patrol Elizabeth Street on Sunday

The state opposition was quick to slam the Premier following his starting admission on Wednesday that the curfew wasn’t based on health advice.

‘It wasn’t a Brett Sutton call, it wasn’t a medical evidence call, it was a captain’s call by the Premier who wanted to keep Melbourne in curfew,’ Victorian Liberals Leader Michael O’Brien said. 

‘The curfew should go. When you consider how extreme a curfew is – in wartime we haven’t been subject to a curfew.’ 

Former Victorian Premier Jeff Kennett also weighed into the debate on Thursday morning.

‘Since when did a deputy chief medical officer have the authority to lock down six million people? On what grounds? At whose request? And apparently without the knowledge of the Chief Medical Officer. We are being led by a very small group of vindictive, thoughtless and cruel individuals,’ he tweeted.

Health experts have also weighed into the debate about night curfews. 

Sydney Associate Professor Adam Kamradt-Scott believes they encouraged large numbers of residents to congregate at shops prior to closing each night.

‘The danger associated with introducing a curfew is shortly before that time, people realise they need to do things, so they may turn up to the shops and find 1000 other people have also had the same dilemma,’ he told the Age

‘At least previously in Australia’s pandemic plans we were doing the opposite, we would look to extend business operation hours and spread people’s risk of infection. A curfew would do the exact reverse of that, which is risk consolidating people in high numbers at specific locations.’

Meanwhile, Professor Sutton revealed medical experts did not request the curfew but it was brought in as the state government declared a state of disaster on August 2. 

The road map out of Melbourne lockdown has been described as a crushing policy. Pictured are Melburnians soaking up the sunshine in the CBD on Thursday

The road map out of Melbourne lockdown has been described as a crushing policy. Pictured are Melburnians soaking up the sunshine in the CBD on Thursday

‘The curfew came in as part of the state of disaster… it wasn’t a state of emergency requirement,’ Professor Sutton told Melbourne radio station 3AW.

‘It wasn’t something that I was against from a public health perspective. 

‘I was consulted on it but it was a separate decision-making pathway.’

Professor Sutton was also asked for his personal opinion on the effectiveness of the curfew during Tuesday’s interview. 

‘I haven’t reflected on it, I think it has been useful. If I put my mind to it, probably,’ he said.  

Professor Sutton denied any rumours that he had fallen out with Mr Andrews and said: ‘We’ve worked very well together.’

‘I get along pretty well with all sorts hopefully across the political spectrum and across all the various personality types,’ he said.

‘My gig is to provide straight up robust advice.

‘I’m pretty comfortable with giving it, maybe when it’s not comfortably received.’  

Under Mr Andrews’ road map to easing restrictions, released on Sunday, lockdown will only end when there are an average of five cases per day, which is not expected in Melbourne until October 26. 

Until then, a curfew will be in place from 9pm to 5am and residents can only leave home for exercise, shopping, school and work, and caregiving.  

MELBOURNE’S ROADMAP OUT OF COVID-19 LOCKDOWN – WHAT YOU WILL BE ABLE TO DO AND WHEN:

Step one: The first step will come in to place on September 13.

Step two: The second step will be implemented when Melbourne has 30-50 COVID-19 cases a day on average over the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on September 28. 

Step three: The move to step three will occur when there is a daily statewide average of five new cases over the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on October 26.

Step four: The move to step four will come when there have been no new COVID-19 cases in the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on November 23.

COVID Normal: After 28 days of no new COVID-19 cases, things will return to normal. 

Step one – 11.59pm on September 13:

Curfew will be eased to 9pm-5am

People can still only leave home for the four reasons (shopping, exercise, work and care or medical attention)

Public gatherings increased to two people, or a household, for a maximum of two hours

 Singles can have one nominated person to their home as part of the ‘singles social bubble’ 

Childcare and early educators to remain closed

Schools will continue to learn remotely unless they have exemptions

 Adult education to continue to be done remotely, unless they have exemption

 Only go to work if you are in a permitted industry 

– Cafes and restaurants will continue with take away only

– Retail businesses will remain open for essential shopping, with others only operating with click and collect

– Only one person per household can do the essential shopping 

Step two – September 28:

Public gatherings increase again to five people from a maximum of two households

Childcare and early educators can re-open

Schools to continue with remote learning, but Prep to Grade Two and Year 11 and Year 12 students will gradually return to class in Term 4 

 There will be an increase to permitted workplaces

Step three – October 26:

Curfew is no longer in place

There are no restrictions on leaving home

Public gatherings increase to 10 people together outdoors

 A ‘household bubble’ will be introduced, so five people from one house can visit another 

Remote learning to continue, but Grades 3 to Year 11 can gradually return to class

– Adult education to continue to be done remotely, but hands on classes will see a phased return to onsite 

 Work from home is encouraged

– Up to 10 people can eat together at restaurants and cafes, with the majority of tables outdoor

– Retail shops to reopen, with hairdresses operating under safety measures but beauty stores to remain closed

– Real estate agents can conduct private inspections by appointment

– The one person per household limit on shopping is to be revoked 

Step four – November 23:

Public gatherings to increase to 50 people outdoors

 Up to 20 visitors can attend a home at any one time

 All adult education will return to onsite with safety measures in place

– Groups limited to 20 indoors and a maximum of 50 patrons per venue

– All retail stores to reopen, while real estate agents can operate with safety measures and by keeping a record of attendants

Step five – COVID normal:

Public gatherings have no restriction

 There will also be no restriction on visitors to homes

– Phased return to onsite work for work from home workers

  Schools to reopen as normal

– Restrictions on hospitality removed, but venues to continue keeping records 



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