A young mum has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor after suffering a seizure in front of her two-year-old.

Suzie Greenham was a healthy 28-year-old hairdresser from Taree, on the New South Wales mid-north coast, when she fell pregnant with her daughter Maya in January.

The expectant mother-of-three knew something was wrong when she started struggling to butter her toast and button up her pants just before she was due to go on maternity leave in mid-August.

Days later, Mrs Greenham suffered three seizures in two three days and received the devastating news that she has glioblastoma multiforme – an aggressive brain cancer with a five per cent survival rate.

Mrs Greenham’s sister Rachel Griffith opened up to Daily Mail Australia about how the devastating news has impacted her family.

Suzie Greenham is pictured with her husband Jesse and children Caleb and Sienna

Suzie Greenham is pictured with her husband Jesse and children Caleb and Sienna

Ms Greenham was diganosed with stage four glioblastoma multiforme - an aggressive brain cancer with a five per cent survival rate - four weeks ago

Ms Greenham was diganosed with stage four glioblastoma multiforme – an aggressive brain cancer with a five per cent survival rate – four weeks ago

‘Five weeks ago it was normal – it was like there was nothing wrong with her,’ she said.

Run down with headaches, swollen ankles and fatigue, Mrs Greenham put her symptoms down to being heavily pregnant. 

She got home from her last day of work on August 11 and took a bath to help the pain in her swollen ankles.

While her two children, four-year-old Caleb and three-year-old Sienna, played in the living room, she suffered her first seizure in the water.

Feeling sick and scared, the pregnant mother left the bathtub and lay on the couch.

‘The next thing she remembers is her daughter standing next to her saying, “Mummy, are you okay? Are you okay?”,’ Ms Griffith said.

While her two children, four-year-old Caleb and three-year-old Sienna, played in the living room, she suffered her first seizure in the water

While her two children, four-year-old Caleb and three-year-old Sienna, played in the living room, she suffered her first seizure in the water

Mrs Greenham realised she was unable to talk and began crying hysterically, before her parents walked through the door and called an ambulance

Mrs Greenham realised she was unable to talk and began crying hysterically, before her parents walked through the door and called an ambulance

Mrs Greenham realised she was unable to talk and began crying hysterically, before her parents walked through the door and called an ambulance.

She had a CT scan and an ultrasound at Manning Base Hospital in Taree, but the results came back clear. 

While she was sent home the following day after an MRI, Mrs Greenham suffered another seizure that night as she lay next to her husband Jesse. 

When the doctors looked at her brain scans again, they noticed a worrying blurry dot.

‘She was rushed straight to John Hunter Hospital but the doctors weren’t sure if it was a tumor or multiple sclerosis, so we were hearing both for a a few weeks.’

On August 25, Mrs Greenham gave birth to her third child five weeks early, Maya Rose, so doctors could do more invasive tests without harming the unborn baby.

On August 25, Mrs Greenham gave birth to her third child five weeks early, Maya Rose (pictured), so doctors could do more invasive tests without harming the unborn baby

On August 25, Mrs Greenham gave birth to her third child five weeks early, Maya Rose (pictured), so doctors could do more invasive tests without harming the unborn baby

'Maya (pictured) has put smiles on faces during the situation when there feels like there is nothing else to smile about,' Ms Greenham's sister said

‘Maya (pictured) has put smiles on faces during the situation when there feels like there is nothing else to smile about,’ Ms Greenham’s sister said 

While her two older children Caleb and Sienna (pictured) are too young to understand what is happening to their mother, their aunt explained that they know something is not right

While her two older children Caleb and Sienna (pictured) are too young to understand what is happening to their mother, their aunt explained that they know something is not right

Following a final scan, she was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. 

‘It was just horrible,’ Ms Griffith said. ‘It tore the family apart.’ 

‘The only shining light of the situation is that she gave birth to a happy healthy baby girl. Maya has put smiles on faces during the situation when there feels like there is nothing else to smile about.’

The mother-of-three has now lost all movement in her right arm.

She is losing movement in her leg and her speech is still impacted by the ‘rapidly growing’ tumor.

While her two older children are too young to understand what is happening to their mother, their aunt explained that they know something is not right.

Ms Greenham (pictured with her parents on their wedding day) is losing movement in her leg and her speech is still impacted by the 'rapidly growing' tumor

Ms Greenham (pictured with her parents on their wedding day) is losing movement in her leg and her speech is still impacted by the ‘rapidly growing’ tumor

The family have set up a Go Fund Me page to help Mr Greenham take time off work be there for his wife and children

The family have set up a Go Fund Me page to help Mr Greenham take time off work be there for his wife and children

‘Caleb and Sienna know something is going on with mum.’

‘They don’t know exactly what it is, but they’ve been picking up on a few things and they’re quite upset.’ 

Mrs Greenham has been undergoing chemotherapy and radiation to slow the growth of the tumor, but her husband – who is a diesel mechanic and runs his own business – will soon become a single dad.

The family have set up a Go Fund Me page to help Mr Greenham take time off work be there for his wife and children. 

‘Jesse has taken extended leave off work to be by her side and look after the kids. She has the support of her family and friends, but they will still need all the help they can get,’ Ms Griffith said.

‘Raising money will help the family spend as much quality time together as they can and allow Jesse to take as much time off work as needed.’

What is Glioblastoma Multiforme?

 Glioblastoma is a type of brain cancer. 

It’s the most common type of malignant brain tumor among adults.

It is usually very aggressive, which means it can grow fast and spread quickly.

There is no cure.

Despite improved surgical techniques, therapies and radiotherapies, patients die within 12 to 18 months from diagnosis.

Only 25 per cent of glioblastoma patients survive more than one year, and only 5 per cent of patients survive more than five years.

Source: The Brain Tumor Charity  



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