Stunning new images show smoke hanging over the San Francisco skyline as dozens of wildfires raging in California, Oregon and Washington send a blanket of ash over the Pacific Ocean after torching 2.8 million acres

Across California, more than 14,000 firefighters are battling 25 separate blazes which have collectively burned nearly 2.2 million acres and left 172,000 people without power during a record heat wave in the drought-stricken state. 

The Creek Fire in Northern California has razed 65 homes, businesses and other structures since it erupted on Friday night and exploded in size over the weekend, ripping through more than 163,000 acres by Wednesday morning.  

The fire – which remains zero percent contained – forced thousands of people in Fresno County to flee from their homes and trapped hundreds of hikers and campers in the Sierra National Forest.  

An apocalyptic orange glow has been cast over Yosemite as the Creek Fire edges closer, leaving a path of charred homes and vehicles in its path.   

To the north in Oregon, a frightening red blanketed towns and more than 80,000 people were forced to evacuate on Tuesday as 35 separate fires blazed out of control, covering more than 367,000 acres.  

Several residents shared photos of red-stained skies on social media, with one in Stayton remarking: ‘Oregon looks like Mars.’ 

In Washington state, 12 large fires have ripped across more than 330,000 acres. Devastating photos captured the charred remains of the tiny town of Malden, home to 300 people, after it was 80 percent destroyed by a fire over Labor Day weekend.  

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Smoke hangs over the San Francisco skyline on Wednesday as dozens of wildfires rage across California

Smoke hangs over the San Francisco skyline on Wednesday as dozens of wildfires rage across California

A satellite image shows smoke from dozens of wildfires in California and Oregon billowing over the Pacific Ocean

A satellite image shows smoke from dozens of wildfires in California and Oregon billowing over the Pacific Ocean

Two of California's largest wildfires are located just outside of San Francisco, which is seen covered in smoke on Wednesday

Two of California’s largest wildfires are located just outside of San Francisco, which is seen covered in smoke on Wednesday

A frightening red haze has been cast over towns in Oregon as 35 wildfires rage around the state

A frightening red haze has been cast over towns in Oregon as 35 wildfires rage around the state

Several Oregon residents shared photos of red-stained skies on social media. The photo above was taken in the middle of the day in Salem

Several Oregon residents shared photos of red-stained skies on social media. The photo above was taken in the middle of the day in Salem  

Similar red skies are seen in Northern California as the Creek Fire continues its path through Fresno County outside Yosemite

Similar red skies are seen in Northern California as the Creek Fire continues its path through Fresno County outside Yosemite

More than 14,000 firefighters are out battling 25 separate blazes in California. Pictured: The Bear Fire in Oroville

More than 14,000 firefighters are out battling 25 separate blazes in California. Pictured: The Bear Fire in Oroville 

Outdoor furniture stands next to a destroyed petrol station on State Route 168 after the Creek Fire passed though

Outdoor furniture stands next to a destroyed petrol station on State Route 168 after the Creek Fire passed though

Shawn Thornton hugs his wife Shannon next to the rubble of their burned home in Malden, Washington, on Tuesday

Shawn Thornton hugs his wife Shannon next to the rubble of their burned home in Malden, Washington, on Tuesday

Golfers warm up on the driving range during the preview day of the Safeway Open in Napa, California, on Wednesday

Golfers warm up on the driving range during the preview day of the Safeway Open in Napa, California, on Wednesday

A man walks along the Redwood highway by the Pacific Ocean as smoke covers Orick, California, on Wednesday

A man walks along the Redwood highway by the Pacific Ocean as smoke covers Orick, California, on Wednesday

A woman crosses a street as smoke from wildfires covers an area near Eureka, California, on Thursday

A woman crosses a street as smoke from wildfires covers an area near Eureka, California, on Thursday

California Governor Gavin Newsom on Sunday night declared a state of emergency as his hard-hit state struggled to beat back the blazes.

The Labor Day weekend heat wave fueled new fires that pushed the state to set a new record for number of acres burned with 2,178,015 as of Tuesday night.  

The previous record was set just two years ago and included the deadliest fire in state history, the Camp Fire, which ripped through the town of Paradise and killed 85 people in November 2018.  

Cal Fire spokeswoman Lynne Tolmachoff said the new record was especially alarming because of how early in the year it was set. 

‘It’s a little unnerving because September and October are historically our worst months for fires,’ Tolmachoff told AP. ‘It’s usually hot, and the fuels really dry out. And we see more of our wind events.’ 

Compared to last year, California has seen over 2,650 more fires and a nearly 2000 percent increase in the acres burned year-to-date (January 1 – September 7), across all jurisdictions, Cal Fire said. 

The state has seen 900 wildfires since August 15, many of them started by an intense series of thousands of lightning strikes in mid-August. There have been eight fire deaths and nearly 4,000 structures destroyed. 

Randy Moore, regional forester for the Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Region, warned that the blazes are expected to worsen in the coming days.  

‘The wildfire situation throughout California is dangerous and must be taken seriously,’ Moore told AP. ‘Existing fires are displaying extreme fire behavior, new fire starts are likely, weather conditions are worsening, and we simply do not have enough resources to fully fight and contain every fire.’   

14,100 firefighters are battling 25 separate blazes in California. California has seen 900 wildfires since August 15

14,100 firefighters are battling 25 separate blazes in California. California has seen 900 wildfires since August 15

Law enforcement officers watch flames into the air as the Bear Fire continues to spread in Oroville, California, on Wednesday

Law enforcement officers watch flames into the air as the Bear Fire continues to spread in Oroville, California, on Wednesday

A Butte County firefighter douses flames at the Bear Fire in Oroville, California, early Wednesday morning

A Butte County firefighter douses flames at the Bear Fire in Oroville, California, early Wednesday morning

Butte County firefighters watch as flames tower over their truck at the Bear Fire in Oroville, California, on Wednesday

Butte County firefighters watch as flames tower over their truck at the Bear Fire in Oroville, California, on Wednesday 

The Creek Fire started on Friday night and blazed through a swathe of northern California in the Sierra National Forest

The Creek Fire started on Friday night and blazed through a swathe of northern California in the Sierra National Forest

It remains unclear how the Creek Fire started, but photos taken on Tuesday showed the devastation in the Meadow Lakes area

It remains unclear how the Creek Fire started, but photos taken on Tuesday showed the devastation in the Meadow Lakes area

Meadow Lakes, a community in northern California, was left devastated by the Creek Fire, which began on Friday evening

Meadow Lakes, a community in northern California, was left devastated by the Creek Fire, which began on Friday evening

A police vehicle drives past a destroyed petrol station on State Route 168, which was devastated by the Creek Fire

A police vehicle drives past a destroyed petrol station on State Route 168, which was devastated by the Creek Fire

The burnt wreckage of a car is pictured on Tuesday near Shaver Lake in northern California, after the Creek Fire

The burnt wreckage of a car is pictured on Tuesday near Shaver Lake in northern California, after the Creek Fire

Smoke from the Creek Fire blots out the sun on Tuesday. Across large parts of California and Nevada the skies were orange

Smoke from the Creek Fire blots out the sun on Tuesday. Across large parts of California and Nevada the skies were orange

The rubble of a petrol station is pictured on Tuesday, in the aftermath of the Creek Fire in California

The rubble of a petrol station is pictured on Tuesday, in the aftermath of the Creek Fire in California

Charred machinery, cars and buildings smolder in the Meadow Lakes area of California following the Creek Fire

Charred machinery, cars and buildings smolder in the Meadow Lakes area of California following the Creek Fire

A person uses heavy equipment to put dirt on fire hotspots after a wildfire destroyed homes and outbuildings in Graham, Washington

A person uses heavy equipment to put dirt on fire hotspots after a wildfire destroyed homes and outbuildings in Graham, Washington

An orange glow hangs over Yosemite as the Creek Fire draws near, threatening evacuations

An orange glow hangs over Yosemite as the Creek Fire draws near, threatening evacuations 

Oregon family runs out of gas while fleeing fast-spreading wildfires during camping trip 

An Oregon family’s camping trip took a terrifying turn when their car ran out of gas as they fled from a raging wildfire.  

Allison Hargett, her husband Tyler and their six-year-old daughter Lilly drove up to Detroit Lake State Park on Labor Day to go boating. 

Hours after they settled in for the night, the family was awoken by evacuation orders at about 1am on Tuesday as the Beachie Creek Fire encroached on their campgrounds. 

The Hargett family quickly hitched up their boat and packed up their car to drive to safety, following behind their friends, Tim and Adamma Dye.  

As they made the trek out of the evacuation zone, Allison filmed several videos from the car which showed the forest enveloped by an eerie orange glow as flames consumed dozens of trees and embers cascaded from the sky.   

The family made it about 20 miles before their car ran out of gas outside Mill City, trapping them in the Marion County evacuation zone. 

Thankfully, they weren’t alone on the road. 

‘[Our friends] were in front of us and saw that we pulled over and turned around, tossed their stuff in the back seat and told us to get in and let’s go,’ Allison told CNN on Tuesday.   

Despite being forced to leave behind their boat, car and much of their gear to fit into their friends’ vehicle, Allison said her family was grateful to have made it to safety.  

‘We completely ran out of gas and would’ve been stranded. They saved us,’ she said.  

On Tuesday night, Cal Fire said that the Creek Fire had worsened in the previous 24 hours owing to strong winds.

‘The fire continued to grow under extreme conditions,’ the agency said in an update. ‘The Red Flag Warning for strong winds will impact the fire in the early morning, with stronger winds to come. The fire made wind driven runs and increased spotting distance. 

‘Red Flag Warning in effect until 11 pm Tuesday for high temperatures, low humidity and high winds.’

The California National Guard (CNG) was called in over the weekend to rescue more than 400 hikers and campers who found themselves trapped in the mountains after roads were closed to the Creek Fire. 

More than 200 people were airlifted from Mammoth Lake over Saturday and Sunday – and another 148 were rescued from near Lake Edison and Chinese Peak early Tuesday morning, the CNG said.  

Officials said at least 65 more hikers could still be trapped in the Sierra National Forest as rescue efforts continue.    

One hiker had been confirmed dead from an apparent heart attack, and officials warned there may be multiple more casualties.   

In Southern California, fires burned in Los Angeles, San Bernardino and San Diego counties, and the forecast called for the arrival of the region’s notorious Santa Anas. The hot, dry winds could reach 50 mph at times, forecasters said.

People in a half-dozen foothill communities east of Los Angeles were being told to stay alert because of a fire in the Angeles National Forest.

‘The combination of gusty winds, very dry air, and dry vegetation will create critical fire danger,’ the National Weather Service warned.

The US Forest Service on Monday decided to close all eight national forests in the southern half of the state and shutter campgrounds statewide.

Firefighters have made headway with one blaze in the area – the El Dorado Fire – which was sparked on Saturday by a gender reveal photoshoot, when a pyrotechnical smoke device sent sparks into the bone-dry brush.

The El Dorado Fire has burned more than 11,259 acres as of Tuesday night and is 19 percent contained. 

Officials said the family behind the gender reveal debacle could face civil or criminal charges for the fire. 

The threat of winds tearing down power lines or hurling debris into them and sparking a wildfire prompted Pacific Gas & Electric, the state’s largest utility, to shut off power to 172,000 customers over the weekend. 

More outages were expected Wednesday, with power not expected to be completely restored until Wednesday night. 

The smoldering remains of Cressman's General Store and Gas Station along CA-168, pictured on Tuesday after the Creek Fire

The smoldering remains of Cressman’s General Store and Gas Station along CA-168, pictured on Tuesday after the Creek Fire

Firefighters (L-R) Rob Spitzer, Max Katay, Josiah Gist and Hunter Grossmann of the Rancheria Station rest on Tuesday

Firefighters (L-R) Rob Spitzer, Max Katay, Josiah Gist and Hunter Grossmann of the Rancheria Station rest on Tuesday 

Burnt down cars are pictured on Tuesday amid the scorched smoldering trees after the passage of the Creek Fire

Burnt down cars are pictured on Tuesday amid the scorched smoldering trees after the passage of the Creek Fire

A fire fighter is pictured in California trying to beat back the Creek Fire on Tuesday in the north of the state

A fire fighter is pictured in California trying to beat back the Creek Fire on Tuesday in the north of the state

On Tuesday night the Creek Fire was recorded as 0% contained, with 163,138 acres having burnt in three days

On Tuesday night the Creek Fire was recorded as 0% contained, with 163,138 acres having burnt in three days

Workers from Pacific Gas & Electric (PGE) watch as the Creek Fire continues to burn on Tuesday

Workers from Pacific Gas & Electric (PGE) watch as the Creek Fire continues to burn on Tuesday

In Washington state, the town of Malden was almost entirely destroyed.

Whitman County Sheriff Brett Myers said that 70-80 percent of homes in the town of 300 people have gone up in flames.

Local news network KREM showed pictured of the charred Malden post office, a fire still burning inside the gutted building.  

The fire station, city hall and other buildings were also consumed, Myers said.

‘The scale of this disaster really can’t be expressed in words,’ he said. ‘The fire will be extinguished, but a community has been changed for a lifetime. I just hope we don’t find the fire took more than homes and buildings. I pray everyone got out in time.’

Larry Frick, who lives in Malden, told KXLY that he spent three hours to save his house amid the flames.

‘It’s gone, brother,’ he texted his sibling after the fire swept through. ‘The entire town is gone. Everything from here to Pine City is gone. The scariest time of my life.’ 

KREM said that at least nine wildfires were burning throughout the Inland Northwest on Monday, amid dry and windy conditions.

Washington Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz tweeted on Monday evening that, ‘Today alone, almost 300,000 acres in Washington have burned.’

‘Thousands of homes are without power. Many families have had to evacuate their homes and many homes have been lost,’ Franz wrote. ‘We’re still seeing new fire starts in every corner of the state.’

Governor Jay Inslee noted that more acres burned on Monday than in 12 of the last fire seasons in the state.  

‘We think all of these are human-caused in some dimension,’ Inslee said.

Janet Conklin, mayor of Bridgeport, looks at what once was her husband's grandfather's Model A Ford after the Pearl Hill Fire

Janet Conklin, mayor of Bridgeport, looks at what once was her husband’s grandfather’s Model A Ford after the Pearl Hill Fire

Shannon, left, and Shawn Thornton comb through the rubble of their burned garage in Malden, Washington on Tuesday

Shannon, left, and Shawn Thornton comb through the rubble of their burned garage in Malden, Washington on Tuesday

Lt. David Brown of the Colfax Fire Department uses a hose during a mop-up in Colfax, Washington on Tuesday

Lt. David Brown of the Colfax Fire Department uses a hose during a mop-up in Colfax, Washington on Tuesday

Hollie Jordan surveys her father's service station that was destroyed by wildfire in Malden, Washington, on Tuesday. "This was filled with work and life and memories and it's all gone," said Jordan

Hollie Jordan surveys her father’s service station that was destroyed by wildfire in Malden, Washington, on Tuesday. ‘This was filled with work and life and memories and it’s all gone,’ said Jordan

The smoldering wreckage of a home and yard is pictured in Malden, Washington, on Tuesday

The smoldering wreckage of a home and yard is pictured in Malden, Washington, on Tuesday

A VW Beetle is charred and destroyed following the wildfire that swept through the Washington town of Malden

A VW Beetle is charred and destroyed following the wildfire that swept through the Washington town of Malden

A commercial building that was destroyed by wildfire is pictured on Tuesday in Malden, Washington

A commercial building that was destroyed by wildfire is pictured on Tuesday in Malden, Washington

Oregon was also struggling to contain its own wildfires, which have devastated more than 230,000 acres, according to Governor Kate Brown.

On Tuesday evening she said her state was ‘in an unprecedented fire event.’ 

She added: ‘Several significant, growing fires across the state continue to spread due to hot, dry weather & high winds. 

‘Oregonians’ lives are at risk. Follow evacuation orders, try to reduce your smoke exposure – and take care of each other.’ 

On Monday evening, the Oregon Climate Office tweeted: ‘Northwest Oregon is currently under an extremely critical fire weather warning. 

‘This is only the second time ever that the Storm Prediction Center has ever issued one for anywhere within the state of Oregon. The other time was August 29, 2006.’ 

There are currently 35 active fires across the state – including the Beachie Creek Fire, which ripped through campgrounds at Detroit Lake State Park overnight on Tuesday.   

A steady stream of vehicles heads west on a road east of Springfield, Oregon

A steady stream of vehicles heads west on a road east of Springfield, Oregon

A sign along Interstate 5 north of Eugene, Oregon, warns drivers on Tuesday that Highway 126 eastbound is closed

A sign along Interstate 5 north of Eugene, Oregon, warns drivers on Tuesday that Highway 126 eastbound is closed

A castle nestled in the Oregon woods is seen glowing red as wildfires rage across the state

A castle nestled in the Oregon woods is seen glowing red as wildfires rage across the state 

People walk by the Pacific Ocean coast as smoke from wildfires covers an area near Seal Rock, Oregon on Tuesday

People walk by the Pacific Ocean coast as smoke from wildfires covers an area near Seal Rock, Oregon on Tuesday

Allison Hargett, her husband Tyler and their six-year-old daughter Lilly had driven up to the lake on Labor Day to go boating when they were suddenly awoken by an evacuation order at about 1am Tuesday as the Beachie Creek Fire encroached on their campsite.  

The Hargett family quickly hitched up their boat and packed up their car to drive to safety, following behind their friends, Tim and Adamma Dye.  

As they made the trek out of the evacuation zone, Allison filmed several videos from the car which showed the forest enveloped by an eerie orange glow as flames consumed dozens of trees and embers cascaded from the sky.  

Allison Hargett, her husband Tyler and their six-year-old daughter Lilly (pictured together) were camping at Detroit Lake State Park when wildfire forced them to evacuate on Tuesday

Allison Hargett, her husband Tyler and their six-year-old daughter Lilly (pictured together) were camping at Detroit Lake State Park when wildfire forced them to evacuate on Tuesday

The family made it about 20 miles before their car ran out of gas outside Mill City, trapping them in the Marion County evacuation zone. Thankfully, they weren’t alone on the road. 

‘[Our friends] were in front of us and saw that we pulled over and turned around, tossed their stuff in the back seat and told us to get in and let’s go,’ Allison told CNN on Tuesday.   

Despite being forced to leave behind their boat, car and much of their gear to fit into their friends’ vehicle, Allison said her family was grateful to have made it to safety.  

‘We completely ran out of gas and would’ve been stranded. They saved us,’ she said.  

The Beachie Creek Fire ignited on August 16 and has since torched more than 130,000 acres, according to local officials. It remains zero percent contained and is traveling at a rate of three acres per hour. 

High winds, dry conditions and a heatwave in the drought-stricken region helped fuel the fire over the weekend, prompting evacuations for several cities in Marion County, which includes Detroit Lake State Park.   

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office released video of multiple structures on fire in Mill City on Wednesday night, hours after the Hargett family and their friends left the area. 

Neighboring Clackamas County declared a state of emergency on Tuesday as four active fires – including Beachie Creek – put several communities under threat. 

Allison Hargett filmed several videos from the car as her family fled from the Beachie Creek Fire in Marion County early Tuesday

The videos showed the forest enveloped by an eerie orange glow as flames consumed dozens of trees and embers cascaded from the sky

As her family fled from the Beachie Creek Fire early Tuesday, Allison Hargett filmed several videos from the car which showed the forest enveloped by an eerie orange glow as flames consumed dozens of trees and embers cascaded from the sky

Law enforcement officials organize evacuations in Leaburg, Oregon, on Tuesday

Law enforcement officials organize evacuations in Leaburg, Oregon, on Tuesday

Meanwhile, firefighters in Colorado were aided by the sudden, surprising arrival of snow. 

Temperatures reached 101 degrees over the Labor Day weekend, and the Cameron Peak wildfire, which had burnt near Fort Collins, was casting an orange haze over the capital, Denver.

However, overnight temperatures plummeted 60 degrees, and residents awoke to find snow on their cars. 

On Monday night the Cameron Peak Fire, which began on August 13 and has so far burned 96,462 acres, was expected to burn until Halloween.

The state had 829 people battling to contain the fire, and evacuations had been ordered.  

After a weekend of record-setting heat topping off at 101 degrees, temperatures dropped more than 60 degrees

After a weekend of record-setting heat topping off at 101 degrees, temperatures dropped more than 60 degrees

Megan Dillard plays in the snow in Vail, Colorado on Tuesday with, from left, Sammy, 4; Hayes, 1; and Donald, aged 3

Megan Dillard plays in the snow in Vail, Colorado on Tuesday with, from left, Sammy, 4; Hayes, 1; and Donald, aged 3

The Cameron Peak wildfire, near Fort Collins, Colorado, was blanketing Denver in orange haze until snow fell on Tuesday

The Cameron Peak wildfire, near Fort Collins, Colorado, was blanketing Denver in orange haze until snow fell on Tuesday

Colorado National Guard members monitor a roadblock leading to the Cameron Peak wildfire as snow falls on Tuesday

Colorado National Guard members monitor a roadblock leading to the Cameron Peak wildfire as snow falls on Tuesday



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