Lindy Chamberlain reveals how she survived prison after being wrongfully jailed when a dingo took her baby – as she shares the truth about Azaria’s ‘black baby dress’

  •  A dingo took Azaria Chamberlain from an Uluru campsite on August 17, 1980 
  •  Her mother Lindy Chamberlain was sentenced to life in jail after 1982 jury trial
  •  She said her time in prison taught her patience before she was released in 1986
  •  Chamberlain said she had made the infamous ‘black baby dress’ for her son
  •  Coroner’s inquest in 2012 found that Azaria had died because of a dingo attack 

Lindy Chamberlain has opened up about her time in jail after she was wrongly locked up over the death of her baby Azaria, who was taken by a dingo. 

Ms Chamberlain lost her nine-week-old daughter when she was dragged from a tent by the wild animal near Uluru, in the Northern Territory, on August 17, 1980.    

The disappearance led to a series of court cases and inquests that saw Chamberlain, 72, jailed for life – before she was eventually cleared.

The grandmother-of-three also discussed the infamous ‘black baby dress’ and said it was made for her eldest son, The Daily Telegraph reported. 

An upcoming documentary ‘Lindy Chamberlain: The True Story’ will reveal new details of the family’s experience and home movies of Azaria.

It will also shed light on Azaria’s homemade black dress which bizarrely convinced some Australians that her mother was involved with witchcraft and had somehow been responsible for her daughter’s death. 

Lindy Chamberlain on famously lost her nine-week-old daughter Azaria (pictured together) to a dingo in Uluru, in the Northern Territory, on August 17, 1980

Lindy Chamberlain on famously lost her nine-week-old daughter Azaria (pictured together) to a dingo in Uluru, in the Northern Territory, on August 17, 1980

Chamberlain (pictured) was wrongfully sentenced to life imprisonment for murder in 1982 and said her time in jail taught her to develop patience

Chamberlain (pictured) was wrongfully sentenced to life imprisonment for murder in 1982 and said her time in jail taught her to develop patience 

Chamberlain also said a 'black baby dress' (pictured above) convinced Australians she was a witch and was responsible for her daughter's death. She made the dress for her son

Chamberlain also said a ‘black baby dress’ (pictured above) convinced Australians she was a witch and was responsible for her daughter’s death. She made the dress for her son

Narrated by Sam Neil, the Network Ten doumetary draws on interviews with eyewitnesses, high profile media identities, high court judges and family friends. 

It will also show the impact of the case on Chamberlain’s other children, Aidan, 46, Reagan, 44, and Kahlia, 37. 

Chamberlain famously screamed ‘a dingo’s got my baby!’ to her fellow campers when the infant was dragged from the tent.  

Previously unheard recordings will show Chamberlain discussing the black baby dress decorated with red ribbons with her mother. 

‘In this tape, recorded years before Azaria was born, I talk about how I’d made the black dress for Reagan and how much I liked it and how much Michael hated it,’ she said.    

Chamberlain was wrongly jailed for murder and her ex-husband Michael was sentenced as an accessory in 1982. 

Chamberlain's ex-husband Michael Chamberlain (pictured together) was also sentenced as an accessory to murder after Azaria's infamous disappearance

Chamberlain’s ex-husband Michael Chamberlain (pictured together) was also sentenced as an accessory to murder after Azaria’s infamous disappearance 

Lindy Chamberlain was a 32-year-old mother of three (she is pictured with husband Michael and sons Reagan and Aidan) when she returned to the family tent to find an empty bassinet

Lindy Chamberlain was a 32-year-old mother of three (she is pictured with husband Michael and sons Reagan and Aidan) when she returned to the family tent to find an empty bassinet 

She was released in 1986 upon the sensational discovery of the baby’s yellow matinee jacket at the base of Uluru.     

Chamberlain also reflected on her time in prison and said it taught her to be patient.

‘In the early days they tried to break me by giving me extra nasty jobs, but I would whip through anything and they soon realised it wasn’t working.’

She said her biggest regret was not the three years she spent in prison but the way her case affected others who were involved. 

Some witnesses were not believed by the police force and legal system and felt traumatised by the process. 

‘It makes me sad that they feel responsible that I went into prison,’ she said.  

The family were acquitted responsibility after a fourth coroner’s inquest in 2012 which found that Azaria died ‘as a result of being attacked and taken by a dingo’.  

A royal commission exonerated her of murder in 1988. Lindy Chamberlain is pictured during the late 1980s with her eldest son Aiden, second son Reagan, daughter Kahlia who was born as her mother served a life sentence and husband Michael

A royal commission exonerated her of murder in 1988. Lindy Chamberlain is pictured during the late 1980s with her eldest son Aiden, second son Reagan, daughter Kahlia who was born as her mother served a life sentence and husband Michael

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